Biology Analogy vs Homology - Duration: 2:23

My Trojan Horse: Analogy and Homology

Biofundamentals - Ancestors, analogies and homologies

McInerney, J. O., W. F. Martin, E. V. Koonin, J. F. Allen, M. Y. Galperin, N. Lane, J. M. Archibald, and T. M. Embley. 2011. “Planctomycetes and Eukaryotes: A Case of Analogy Not Homology.” 33 (11): 810–817.

Biofundamentals @ UC Boulder- Ancestors, analogies and homologies

Analogy vs. Homology - Theory of Evolution

Of course, these criteria don't always apply — for example, two organisms mightshare a homologous gene, but the gene doesn't really "develop." However, these criteriaare nonetheless useful. By studying the anatomy of a trait in living organisms and infossils and by observing how the trait grows and changes, biologists can usually findout if a structure in two organisms is analogous or homologous.

Analogous vs Homologous

McInerney, J. O., W. F. Martin, E. V. Koonin, J. F. Allen, M. Y. Galperin, N. Lane, J. M. Archibald, and T. M. Embley. 2011. “Planctomycetes and Eukaryotes: A Case of Analogy Not Homology.” 33 (11): 810–817.

Biology Analogy vs Homology


DEFINITION: A contemporary culture or behavior that, by the use of analogy and homology, is considered to be similar to another in history and therefore shed light on the latter. It is the use of both material and nonmaterial aspects of a living culture to form models to test interpretations of archaeological remains.When two or more organs or structures are basically similar to each other in construction but are modified to perform different functions, they are said to be serially homologous. An example of this is a wing and a whale’s flipper. Both originated in the forelimbs of early mammalian ancestors, but they have undergone different evolutionary modification to perform the radically different tasks of flying and swimming, respectively. Sometimes it is unclear whether similarities in structure in different organisms are analogous or homologous. An example of this is the wings of bats and birds. These structures are homologous in that they are in both cases modifications of the forelimb bone structure of early reptiles. But birds’ wings differ from those of bats in the number of digits and in having feathers for flight while bats have none. And most importantly, the power of flight arose independently in these two different classes of vertebrates; in birds while they were evolving from early reptiles, and in bats after their mammalian ancestors had already completely from reptiles. Thus, the wings of bats and birds can be viewed as analogous rather than homologous upon a more rigorous scrutiny of their morphological differences and evolutionary origins.DEFINITION: The description and analysis of contemporary cultures, which is based almost entirely on in-depth fieldwork. The formulating of generalizations about culture and the drawing of comparisons are components of ethnography. It is part of the subdiscipline of cultural anthropology. An important technique is participant observation, whereby the anthropologist lives in the society being studied. Ethnography provides data to archaeologists through analogy and homology. An ethnographic study is that of the cultural characteristics of a particular ethnic or social group.